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Archive for August 2012

Friday Funnies: More Death in Pennsylvania

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Visits Office To Prove That He Is Not Dead

 

“I’m not dead, honest I’m not.”

This statement by J. Franklin Wells 29, and of rather quiet disposition caused a general sensation in The Genius office today.

In his hand he held a newspaper In which his death, due to peritonitis was chronicled.

“That isn’t true,” he remarked as he pointed to the “J. Franklin Wells” obituary notice.

Mr. Wells convinced the editor that he was still alive. To strengthen his argument he said he had been to the Minerd undertaking parlors to view the “corpse.”

Mr. Minerd was as much surprised as “J. Franklin.” He knew nothing of any such death and started an investigation to determine the instigator of the hoax.

The “death” notice gave correctly the names of Mr. Wells’ parents and other family connections. The age was given as 27 and it was incorrectly asserted that he was a Uniontown high school graduate.

Mr. Wells had been ill for the last few days of grip but has entirely recovered. Recently he was employed in the repair shop of Bob Miller in Iowa street.

The Morning Herald, Uniontown, Pennsylvania, 20 April 1938, page 9, column 1.

——

“The Genius” is short for “The Genius of Liberty,” another local paper in the Uniontown area.

 

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Written by N. P. Maling

31 August 2012 at 00:01

Sunday’s Obituary: Alfred Paul Bayly, Seattle, Washington

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Here are three obituary/newspaper item statements about the same person, from two different newspapers on the same day. Which one do you like best? They are all different to some degree.

Alfred Paul Bayly

Alfred Paul Bayly, 75, of 851 Thistle St., a retired iron molder died Wednesday.

Born in San Francisco, he had lived in Seattle 41 years. Survivors include his wife, Mary, and a brother, Frank Bayly, Bainbridge Island.

Rosary will be said at 8. p.m. Friday in the Georgetown Funeral Home, and requiem mass at 9 a.m. Saturday at Our Lady of Lourdes Church. Burial will be in Calvary Cemetery.

Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Seattle, Washington, 2 March 1951, page 21, column 5.

Alfred P. Bayly

Rosary for Alfred Paul Bayly, 75 of 851 Thistle St., will be said at 8 o’clock tonight in the Georgetown Funeral Home and Requiem Mass at 9 o’clock tomorrow forenoon, in Our Lady of Lourdes Church. Burial will be in Calvary. He died Wednesday.

Mr. Bayly, born in San Francisco, had lived in Seattle 41 years. He was a retired iron molder.

Surviving are his wife, Mary, and a brother, Frank Bayly, Bainbridge Island.

Seattle Times, Seattle, Washington, 2 March 1951, page 40, column 7.

 —

BAYLY – Alfred P., Feb. 28, at 511 Thistle Street, age 75 years. Beloved husband of Mary L. Bayly. Brother of Frank and George Bayly. Rosary Friday (today), 8. p.m. from Chapel Georgetown Funeral Home. Requiem High Mass Saturday, 9. a.m. from Our Lady of Lourdes Church. Interment Calvary.

Seattle Times, Seattle, Washington, 2 March 1951, page 40, column 2.

The correct street address is 851 Thistle Street, although, in the 1940 U. S. Census, the family had lived at 857 Thistle Street (and was mis-enumerated as “Dayly.”

The brother, Frank, appears in all of them, but George in only one. In a fourth item, from the P-I, he also appears; but I didn’t post it because the image I have is too dark.

Tell me what you think.

NPM

 

Written by N. P. Maling

26 August 2012 at 00:01

Friday Funnies — Death in Pennsylvania

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One does need to check the dateline of this story. Additional corroboration would also be helpful.

Nearly Buried Alive.

Aged Mr. Cole Came to Life in his Coffin, but the Shock Killed Him.

Bethlehem, April 1. – Eli Cole, of Kalellen, near here, aged eighty-one years, apparently died last Tuesday, but when the undertaker put the supposed corpse in the coffin it uttered a groan, and it was found that it was a case of suspended animation. Cole vividly described his gruesome feelings while being prepared for burial. He lingered three days and died yesterday from prostration produced by brooding over his horrible experience.

—–

The North American, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2 April 1892, page 1, column 1 (below the fold)

Written by N. P. Maling

24 August 2012 at 00:01

Posted in Family History, Humor

The Wonderment of Walter Goodwin Davis

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I’ve been working with a copy of Lunt: A History of the Lunt Family in America, by Thomas S. Lunt, published in 1913.

There are a few weird things in it that can be traced to differences with Walter Goodwin Davis’ treatments of the family in his Descendants of Abel Lunt and Massachusetts and Maine Families in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis.

One item is that Davis seems to have renamed a child of Henry(5) Lunt from Joseph to Henry. The Newbury, Massachusetts vital records record at volume 1, page 297 a Joseph born on 13 February 1774 but there is no similar entry for a Henry at page 296. There’s no indication in either Lunt or Davis that the child born on 13 February was a twin, either. Where did Davis come up with another Henry? Or did he?

 

Written by N. P. Maling

20 August 2012 at 17:16

Posted in Family History

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Haven Genealogy Available on Lulu.com

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Written by N. P. Maling

18 August 2012 at 12:39

Posted in Genealogy

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Sanity Checking with Multiple Genealogy Programs

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There are some people, like me, who are not quite satisfied with just one program for genealogical purposes. I use several, and keep an eye out on the others for features that might suit me well.

Lifelines

LifeLines

LifeLines (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

is one of the programs I use on a semi-regular basis. It is an old program (console window, anyone?) and has a long history of strong development by the maintainers. Thomas Wetmore originally wrote it back in the olden days of Unix and DOS, but it’s still around.

One of the things I like about Lifelines is it’s powerful scripting language. This language takes a bit of getting used to but once you know it, it seems intuitive. The program comes bundled with a lot of scripts, some better than others, and some near-duplicates of others. The verify script is one of the most powerful sanity-checkers on the market (did I mention that Lifelines is free?). Some of the things it reports on are age boundaries (birth, marriage, and death), multiple marriages, kids out of order, and so on. Several scripts check for people who might be in the Social Security Death Master Index. Another script called, weirdly enough, zombies, looks for people who don’t have death items (death, probate, burial, and so on).

I ran verify recently on a 5500+ person database and it came up with nearly 1600 items that it thought were interesting and that fell outside of user-programmable boundaries. It’s not for the faint-of-heart to look at this report as it can be a lot to digest. The nice thing about the report is that when I go through it, item by item, I can tighten up the quality of the data on a semi-regular basis, and gain a semi-regular consistency for the entire database. It might take years to finally go through the entire list and complete each item, but knowing about these items is the important thing.

Like verify, the zombies script reads through the database and plucks out those that have death items. This report is much simpler, and sortable so you can find the people by year, instead of in database order. The great thing about this report is that you find out who is in the database that is not marked as dead, dead, dead, as in dead. The script doesn’t consider the deceased flag, if there is one on the person, it makes you think about getting the details, and you’ll want to go out and get the details right away.

If you’ve added a lot of what I call “the moderns” you’ll want to run one of the SSDI check scripts and follow up on a visit to the Death Master Index on your favorite online site that has one. I used to use the one at Rootsweb.com, but Ancestry.com removed it to their own site for some reason. Shucks, the Rootsweb version was better, IMHO.

Enough about the great Lifelines scripts. Multiple programs for genealogical data analysis are a must if you are serious about the pastime. Knowing what’s good data and bad is a good idea, as well as ethically correct. My other genealogy programs include an old version of Legacy, and a current version of The Master Genealogist.

TMG is the one I use on a regular basis as it is almost as powerful as Lifelines in the analysis and reporting facets. The only drawback to TMG’s reporting is that it’s not as flexible and programmable as Lifelines. Legacy, on the other hand, even though my copy is quite dated, is pretty good at picking out bad data, too. Even though I haven’t used Legacy for a while, like Lifelines, I keep it around as a variant finding tool.

Written by N. P. Maling

1 August 2012 at 00:01