Sea Genes

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Posts Tagged ‘newspaper obituaries

Sunday’s Obituary: Lawrence E. White, Seattle, Washington

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Rock Victim’s Services Set

Funeral services for Lawrence E. White, 12, who died Thursday in Maynard Hospital of injuries suffered when struck in the head by a rock hurled in play by a schoolmate, will be at 4:30 p.m. Saturday in Columbia Funeral Home. Private cremation will follow. Lawrence was in the sixth grade at John Muir School. He had more than nine years of perfect Sunday School attendance at the Mt. Baker Presbyterian Church.

He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. White, 3115 Cascadia Ave., and a sister, Phyllis Mary.

(Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Seattle, Washington, 1 April 1950, page 14)

Seattle-PI_19500401_p14

Written by N. P. Maling

28 September 2014 at 00:01

Sunday’s Obituary: George Giesler, Sedro Woolley, Washington

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George Giesler Dies in Skagit Hospital

Sedro Woolley — George F. Giesler, a longtime resident of this city, died Thursday in Skagit Valley Hospital at Mount Vernon. Mr. Giesler, 76, came here in 1925 from Tennessee.

He was a retired fireman for Goodyear-Nelson Lumber Co.

Services will be Saturday at 3 p.m. at Lemley Funeral Home, with the Rev. W. V. Kononen officiating. Burial will be in Sedro Woolley Cemetery.

Survivors include his wife Ellen; four sons, Donald of Sedro Woolley, Charles of Burlington, James of Auburn and William of Seattle; three daughters, Miss Anna Mae Giesler of Seattle, Mrs. Mildred Moore of Bremerton and Mrs. Mary Constance of Ephrata; a sister, Mrs. Rhodie Davis, and a brother, Rod, in Tennessee.

(Bellingham Herald, Bellingham, Washington, 1 April 1960)

BellinghamHerald_19600401_p3

Written by N. P. Maling

21 September 2014 at 00:01

Sunday’s Obituary: Charles Carey, from The Oregonian

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Death Takes Charles Carey

Charles E. Carey, 55, one-time chief consulting engineer of the Bonneville power administration and a pioneer in Columbia river development, died Sunday at the Veterans’ hospital in Sawtelle, Cal., after an illness of several months. Western regional director of the United States bureau of reclamation at the time of his death, he was transferred to Sacramento, Cal., as engineer in charge of power and sales at the Central Valley project in December 1941.

Bonneville Posts Held

He was a member of the Columbia river survey committee of the national resources planning board and came to the Bonneville project as rate engineer, advancing to chief consulting engineer in 1939. He was appointed acting administrator of Bonneville power in February, 1939, when James D. Ross became ill and carried on in this capacity after Ross’ death for many months. Following appointment of a permanent administrator, Carey was named assistant chief of the administration’s system planning and marketing division. In August, 1940. He held this position until his transfer to California the following year.

His long experience in the power field began when he took a job as a journeyman electrician at the age of 15. He later worked his way through the University of Oklahoma.

He designed and built the electrical transmission system for the Bonneville and Grand Coulee dams, and had taught electrical engineering at the University of New Mexico, was head of the power division of the bureau of the budget in Washington and was employed for a time by the Seattle, Wash., municipal power system.

His widow, Verle, and a daughter, Marjorie, of Sacramento, survive.

 —

The Oregonian, Portland, Oregon, 1 September 1945, page 13.

The Oregonian 1 September 1945 901, p. 13

Written by N. P. Maling

9 September 2012 at 00:01

Sunday’s Obituary: John Fredric Neumann, Portland, Oregon

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Retired Road Employe Dies

Retired Worker Served County

Ten sons and daughters and a widow survive John Fredric Neumann, who died Wednesday at his home in St. Johns at the age of 78. Mr Neumann was a farmer, carpenter and saw-mill operator for many years. He retired in June 1948, after 18 years as an employe of the Multnomah county road department. Born in Germany on March 28, 1872, Mr. Neumann was brought to the United States as a child and became a citizen at 21. He was married September 5, 1895, to Augusta A. R. Block in Howard Lake, Minn.

Mr. Neumann brought his family west to Ridgefield, Wash., in 1924. They lived there until 1929 when they moved to Cornelius Pass, Or. Since 1943 Mr. and Mrs. Neumann have lived at 8323 N. Princeton street.

Mr. Neuman is survived by eight brothers and sisters, 29 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren. Surviving sons and daughters are Arnold and Anthony Neumann of Portland, Harry Neumann, Murphy, Or.; Martin Neumann, Scappoose; Mrs. Myrtle Maschke, Portland; Mrs. Martha Barnes, Vancouver, Wash.; Mrs. Elsie Hirsch, Howard Lake, Minn.; Mrs. Alice Bauer, Vancouver, Wash.; Mrs. Margaret Terpening, Vancouver, Wash., and Mrs. Gertrude Rosevear, Kalama, Wash.

Funeral services will be Saturday at 11 a. m. at the St. Johns funeral home. Interment will be at Columbia cemetery.

 —

The Oregonian, Portland, Oregon, 1 September 1950, page 13.

The Oregonian, 1 September 1950, page 13

 

 

 

Written by N. P. Maling

2 September 2012 at 00:01

Friday Funnies: More Death in Pennsylvania

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Visits Office To Prove That He Is Not Dead

 

“I’m not dead, honest I’m not.”

This statement by J. Franklin Wells 29, and of rather quiet disposition caused a general sensation in The Genius office today.

In his hand he held a newspaper In which his death, due to peritonitis was chronicled.

“That isn’t true,” he remarked as he pointed to the “J. Franklin Wells” obituary notice.

Mr. Wells convinced the editor that he was still alive. To strengthen his argument he said he had been to the Minerd undertaking parlors to view the “corpse.”

Mr. Minerd was as much surprised as “J. Franklin.” He knew nothing of any such death and started an investigation to determine the instigator of the hoax.

The “death” notice gave correctly the names of Mr. Wells’ parents and other family connections. The age was given as 27 and it was incorrectly asserted that he was a Uniontown high school graduate.

Mr. Wells had been ill for the last few days of grip but has entirely recovered. Recently he was employed in the repair shop of Bob Miller in Iowa street.

The Morning Herald, Uniontown, Pennsylvania, 20 April 1938, page 9, column 1.

——

“The Genius” is short for “The Genius of Liberty,” another local paper in the Uniontown area.

 

Written by N. P. Maling

31 August 2012 at 00:01

Sunday’s Obituary: Alfred Paul Bayly, Seattle, Washington

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Here are three obituary/newspaper item statements about the same person, from two different newspapers on the same day. Which one do you like best? They are all different to some degree.

Alfred Paul Bayly

Alfred Paul Bayly, 75, of 851 Thistle St., a retired iron molder died Wednesday.

Born in San Francisco, he had lived in Seattle 41 years. Survivors include his wife, Mary, and a brother, Frank Bayly, Bainbridge Island.

Rosary will be said at 8. p.m. Friday in the Georgetown Funeral Home, and requiem mass at 9 a.m. Saturday at Our Lady of Lourdes Church. Burial will be in Calvary Cemetery.

Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Seattle, Washington, 2 March 1951, page 21, column 5.

Alfred P. Bayly

Rosary for Alfred Paul Bayly, 75 of 851 Thistle St., will be said at 8 o’clock tonight in the Georgetown Funeral Home and Requiem Mass at 9 o’clock tomorrow forenoon, in Our Lady of Lourdes Church. Burial will be in Calvary. He died Wednesday.

Mr. Bayly, born in San Francisco, had lived in Seattle 41 years. He was a retired iron molder.

Surviving are his wife, Mary, and a brother, Frank Bayly, Bainbridge Island.

Seattle Times, Seattle, Washington, 2 March 1951, page 40, column 7.

 —

BAYLY – Alfred P., Feb. 28, at 511 Thistle Street, age 75 years. Beloved husband of Mary L. Bayly. Brother of Frank and George Bayly. Rosary Friday (today), 8. p.m. from Chapel Georgetown Funeral Home. Requiem High Mass Saturday, 9. a.m. from Our Lady of Lourdes Church. Interment Calvary.

Seattle Times, Seattle, Washington, 2 March 1951, page 40, column 2.

The correct street address is 851 Thistle Street, although, in the 1940 U. S. Census, the family had lived at 857 Thistle Street (and was mis-enumerated as “Dayly.”

The brother, Frank, appears in all of them, but George in only one. In a fourth item, from the P-I, he also appears; but I didn’t post it because the image I have is too dark.

Tell me what you think.

NPM

 

Written by N. P. Maling

26 August 2012 at 00:01

Sunday’s Obituary – W. A. Monroe, Spokane, Washington

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W. A. Monroe, 79, Pioneer, Passes

Gained Prominence in Business and Civic Affairs – Funeral Wednesday.

Death came Monday to William Allison Monroe, 79, well-known engineering accountant and pioneer of 1889. He died in Sacred Heart hospital following a stroke sufferred four days before.

He was the husband of another well-known fgure in Spokane’s history, Mrs. Mary Monroe, educator and civic leader. They came to Seattle in July, 1889, from Newark, Ohio, where they were married in 1886. A few days after the great fire of August 4, 1889, they came to Spokane from the Coast city, and had resided here since.

Their home was at 5711 Cowley, near the Lincoln school Mrs. Monroe served as principal from 1891 to 1929. Closely identified with affairs of the community for more than two generations Mr. Monroe, like his wife, was held in high regard. Her membership in the Spokane park board also added to the large circle of friendship.

Held Important Positions.

Mr. Monroe became deputy city auditor soon after his arrival, serving with Theodore Reed. In the early part of the century he was deputy to General James a Drain, then county clerk.

In 1905 he joined Winters, Parsons & Boomer, railway contractors, and advanced to manager of the company, which built many railways, dams and other projects in the west. He still held this connection at his death, and one of the early arrivals yesterday was H. H. Boomer, San Francisco, who started for Spokane when he learned of Mr. Monroe’s illness.

Mr. Monroe also was a mamber of the board of directors for the Old National Bank Building company.

Besides the widow, Mr. Monroe is survived by a sister, Mrs. Jessie Stewart, and a brother, Charles P. Monroe, both of Columbus, Ohio; two nephews there, and William L. Matthews, a nephew, spokane.

Honorary pallbearers selelcted by Mrs. Monroe for funeral services at 1 o’clock Wednesday at Smith & Co.’s are all intimate associates. They are Mr. Boomer, L. M. Davenport, M. F. Fry, D. W. Twohy, A. W. Witherspoon, Joseph Moris, William Kuhlman, John W. Duncan, Professor George Craig, Cheney; E. A. Shadle, Lyman C. Reed and Orville C. Pratt.

Active bearers will be W. L. Mathews, Stanley G. Witter, Jerry O’Brien, J. S. Lee, John J. Hasfurther and Robert C. Patterson. Dean McAllister, Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist will read the service. Burial will be at Greenwood Cemetery.

Spokane Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Washington, 19 March 1940, page 6, column 3.

Spokesman-Review 19 March 1940, p. 6, c. 3.

Spokesman-Review 19 March 1940, p. 6, c. 3.

Written by N. P. Maling

4 March 2012 at 01:01